What if you had a “Back of the Napkin” experience every time?

What’s it worth to you to have those transformative moments when everything you’ve been working for is suddenly clear?  You know, the moment when you know you’ve seen it and you can never unsee it.   The road opens up and you see everything clearly.

Every time you fail to use compelling visuals and story in your strategic business meetings and communications, you only engage about 30% of your audience.  That means that the 70% of your people who are visual learners, who are managing organizations or programs, who are making decisions to spend millions of dollars and who are responsible for executing company strategy, are not really ‘getting it’ a significant amount of the time.  If they aren’t fully engaged, you can be sure they are not tracking mission critical information and strategic messages.  How do you think that impacts your business?

 

Our brains are hardwired to think in pictures and stories.  Sure we know this, and we all know the phrase “a picture is a worth a thousand words”. However, in situations where it’s absolutely critical to engage people, to pull them into a more creative mindset, to look at complex business problems and opportunities, and to truly see and understand the Big Picture that informs strategic decisions about 10’s or 100’s of millions of dollars, you need more than those 3-D PowerPoint pie charts and Smart Art Process graphics.  You need something that lines up directly to how our brains naturally function.  Why would you want anything less?

Business Illustration is as critical to your meetings as a facilitator

What if you didn’t have to go back and do it over again?

What if you unleashed the power of your meetings and that unleashed the power of your business?

What if that happened because you had that “Back of the Napkin” experience every time?

Big Picture Story Maps Get Everyone On the Same Page

What if people across your organization truly understood and could articulate the Big Picture?

What if you had a one page story that could synthesize 30, 40, or 50 PowerPoint slides?

What if that story became the central tool in a communication strategy that everyone talked about?